BEWARE WORK-FROM-HOME MOM SCAM

My one remaining fan – he works so hard at it

Recently I received several emails directing me to a news site for someone calling themselves Amy Livingston. Because the emails were seemingly sent by people I knew, I clicked on the link and was introduced to Amy Livingston. After reading everything, including the comments, I couldn’t shake the gnawing suspicion something just wasn’t right.

Years ago I did an article on local scams. During the interview the lady at the Better Business Bureau(BBB) said, “If something seems too good to be true, it usually is.” With that in mind I googled, ‘Is Amy Livingston, work-from-home mom, a scam?’ According to several sources, this so-called Amy Livingston, like Satan,  goes by many different names. Somewhere there is a stock photo of a benign looking woman and child being used as an integral part of a work-from-home SCAM.

These scammers seem to be hacking into people’s email accounts and sending emails to their close contacts. The ones I received linked me to a news15 site. So far I’ve learned the so-called news story is just as bogus as Amy Livingston and the site. A couple of other non-news sites being used by these scammers are: News18today.com and News10reports. No telling how many people they’ve fleeced as the so-called work-at-home-mom lives in San Diego, Greensboro, Vienna, Ho Chi Minh, and just plug in a name why don’t you.

An even scarier aspect to this story is if your email account has been hacked or highjacked by these parasites you must be very careful of your passwords to important stuff like FINANCIAL AND RETAIL ACCOUNTS. If you forget your passwords to such accounts, you may want to open a new one and use a strong password. If your computer has already been  highjacked, your changed info could be going straight to the hackers’ account(s). These scammers are apparently very computer-savvy hell-bent upon parting you from your money by any means necessary. All I can tell you is if you feel your account has been violated act quickly and aggressively to purge your system of the offending violater.

STAY ALERT. If you receive an email linking you to Livingston or whatever pseudonym they are using, please BEWARE.  The thing that alerted me that work-from-home-mom could be a scam was that so-called Amy kept everything so close to the vest. It was obvious you would have to wander farther down that rabbit hole to learn what those ‘simple forms’ were she filled out that garnered her $15,000 – $17,000 a month. Aside from being vague as hell, it just sounded too good to be true.

This is just a brief post asking that you please beware and be a friend and alert your contacts to would-be scammers. Also, alert them when you think their email may have been hacked. Right now Internet scammers seem to be multiplying like cockroaches. And if  you’re looking for law enforcement to come galloping in on a white horse to save us, don’t. Like Wall Street bankers these guys are too complicated to be taken down. For now we consumers must arm ourselves with information and question everything.

Zoey’s gone. I’m so all alone.
I kind of miss that grr-rl

Advertisements

26 responses to “BEWARE WORK-FROM-HOME MOM SCAM

  1. Hello Mary Brown, thanks for informing us about this heinous scammer. I recently received an email from a close family member who was hacked by this scammer.

    • Glenn, times are hard and for these predators to be preying upon those who can least afford to be preyed upon is so wrong. They say the pen is mightier than the sword. If my post keeps just one person from being scammed then my work is done. Pass it along. Thanks so much.

    • I RECEIVED AN E-MAIL YESTERDAY FROM A CLOSE FRIEND OF MINE WITH THIS SAME NEWS CAST, ONLY THIS “AMY LIVINGSTON” WAS FROM HATTISBURG, MS. PROBABLY BECAUSE I AM FROM MISSISSIPPI. ANYWAY, I STARTED FILLING OUT THE APPLICATION AND THE COST WAS $99. I STOPPED AND CLOSED OUT OF IT. TODAY, I MISSED A PHONE CALL FROM A LOCAL NUMBER, SO I CALLED IT BACK AND IT WAS A GUY NAMED JAMES BANKS. HE SAID THAT HE WAS CALLING BECAUSE I HAD STARTED FILLING OUT THE FORM AND STOPPED. HE ALSO INFORMED ME THAT I WAS A PREFERED CUSTOMER AND THAT HE WAS ABLE TO OFFER THIS TO ME FOR $27 INSTEAD OF THE ORIGINAL $99. HE WAS VERY PERSISTANT. HE KEPT WANTING ME TO GIVE HIM MY CREDIT CARD NUMBER AND I KEPT TELLING HIM THAT I WANTED TO RESEARCH THIS A LITTLE MORE AND TALK WITH MY HUSBAND. HE INFORMED ME THAT THIS OFFER WOULD NOT LAST. I TOLD HIM THAT I WOULD CALL HIM BACK ON THE NUMBER THAT HE HAD CALLED ME FROM SINCE IT WAS A LOCAL NUMBER. I THEN GOOGLED THE NAME “AMY LIVINGSTON” AND SURE ENOUGH, IT IS A SCAM. I TRIED TO CALL THE NUMBER BACK THAT HE HAD CALLED FROM AND IT SAID UNFORTUNATELY THERE WERE NO REPRESENTATIVES THERE TO TAKE MY CALL.

      • Sounds like you brushed up against the slime personally. Hope you showered afterward. In all seriousness, informing others is the most powerful weapon we can use against these would-be scammers. Also, if something seems too good to be true, it usually is. Before giving out your credit card info, first see what you can find out about the offer on the Internet. If those who find out about this scam play it forward to the next person and the next, I doubt it would go on. This Amy Livingston is a pretty old scam that goes by several names. Since they seek to use our computers against us we must turn it around and use our computers and our words to inject a virus that will stop this scam and others like it dead in their tracks. Be sure to let others know. Thanks

    • Georgina, thanks for commenting. Scamming people out of their hard earned money is bad but this one takes it to a whole new level. I mean who doesn’t champion the stay-at-home-mom just trying to earn some extra cash while home with the kids. These scammers did their homework from that standpoint. Also, it’s an old scam but times are hard for millions worldwide and that they also know. So many people are unemployed, underemployed, and what have you. Sometime desperation make you do dumb things. But then these jokers use your own friends, family members, and associates against you by sending out emails in their names. Pass it along, Georgina. Thanks so much.

  2. I just received an email from a friend about Amy Livingston. She seems to be a stay at home mom in whole lot of towns! According to the email, she is a stay at home mom, in my town, as well as yours and many others!! I found your article very interesting read. Thank You

    • Patricia, lets not forget all over the world – lol. I’m thinking of doing a follow-up post to get folks who were ripped off to tell their stories. This is an old scam so I know there are a lot of folks ready to run Amy Livingston out of town. Thanks for commenting. Too funny.

  3. I JUST got the email as well. Scary how it also mentioned my home town in the story! That is what really made me suspicious. Glad I found your blog.

    • Reggie, these scams don’t die, they multiply. Doesn’t it make you feel all warm and cozy when your scam is brought to you personalized with the very place you’re from – lol?

  4. I received an email from an Uncle. Was his account hacked or mine? Thanks for the information about this scam.

    • First of all Kimberly, thanks for commenting. Secondly, contact your uncle and make sure he really did not send you the email. If he didn’t send it to you, then chances are his email account was hacked and the scammers extracted his contacts. If you didn’t attempt to send them your credit card info, you should be fine.

  5. I got the email from a close friend today as well. I live in Vancouver and he lives in Toronto, Canada. His email address was with Yahoo.com. Did the sender in your case also use Yahoo? Everyone posted here in the last 24 hours. Thanks.

    • Tina, did you contact your close friend to make sure he/she didn’t actually send the email? This is key because some relatives, friends, and associates, may get it and pass it along because it seems legit. If your friend didn’t send you the email then it’s possible their email account was hacked and the scammers extracted their contacts. First and foremost, make sure your friend didn’t send it. Let me know what you find out. Thanks again, Tina

      • Just so everyone knows. I opened the email and it took control of my email program and forwarded the email to my 200+ contacts. I am on a Mac and thought this could not happen. But it did. If you have opened the link within the email – change your email password immediately.

      • Reggie, knowledge is power. I didn’t go that far down into the rabbit hole, so can’t speak from your perspective. For others with concerns, maybe you could share what you did, if anything, to resolve the problem. Thanks so much for sharing.

  6. Being on a Mac, I thought that I was “immune” to any virus attack. This article seemingly is informative about working from home, which ironically I do work from home, but don’t make $13,000 a month. Once I clicked on the link and realized the site was false, it was too late. 8 hours later I started receiving failure notices from my ISP for emails that were undeliverable. That gave me the heads up something was wrong. I immediately changed my password. Unfortunately, the deed was done. 200+ emails sent out. I am STILL sending apologies to clients and relatives. I warned my 20 most recent contacts. But still so many went through. I feel like my “online reputation” has been tarnished. The best advice I can give – do not open any links from family, friends or co-workers unless you are 100% sure it is from them. If you are on a Mac – be warned – we are NOT virus proof as we thought. Apple is the #1 brand in the world right now. So surely they are coming under attack. Hope this helps someone, anyone out there.

    • Thanks so much, Reggie. I was told the same thing about the MAC. I am a PC user and have Malware Bytes and other anti-virus software. I changed my password also and monitor my accounts through a different computer, luckily I have three. Hopefully people will learn to pause before clicking, especially if something looks too good to be true.
      Also, for all struggling writers I’ve been receiving a lot of emails from Realwritingjobs.com. Please don’t give them your credit card info. Research any online company requesting money. There are sites such as Bistro where you can get writing jobs for free. Also, read the fine print. Thanks again, Reggie.

  7. myself and my sisters got the same email from supposedlly our dad…as we all considered and looked into this something happened the ink stopped working this was yesterday june 4th..i informed my sister and the both couldn’t open it. After midnight it started working again but a few end numbers were changed…am not a computer wiz but i noticed a few changes…Now what worried me was i got about 10 of these emails sent from my sister’s account with in a space of an hour, til 1.34am british time this person sent these links…my guess the hacked into her account or she may have forgotten to sign out earlier in the afternoon after we checked it…..This issue is so saddening as family emails are been used and as people we tend to trust our families to want the best for us especially if you are close…so if we didnt take care to investigate further $99 would have gone in the drain(this is how much the article said we need to pay to get good deals to auction)…please lets keep people aware of this and spread the word….

    • I agree wholeheartedly. In order to fight back we must spread the word. I am sorry this happened to you guys. It’s bad enough when these parasites limit it to just the individual being scammed. But when they manage to hack into family and friends emails and use them as well, it’s even worse. Times are hard and folks have got to learn not to give out credit card info no matter how good the offer may sound. Sometime if it sounds too good to be true, check into it. You definitely have the right attitude. If we all work together, maybe we could at least put a dent in this pervasive, invasive, Internet scam epidemic. Thanks so much.

  8. It seems to have been awhile since anyone has commented on this scam. It sort of happend to me Thursday 9/20/12 only the other way around. I logged into my email and discovered a demon mailer saying a message I sent was not delivered. Knowing I was at work at the time the message was sent I looked at my “sent” box and found that several people in my contact list had been sent a link to a story about Amy Livingston from Leavenworth, KS. What a shock! I email everyone to let them know about the scam but it is still hard to believe it happened to me! Keep spreading the word, this is still being spread!

  9. Believe it or not this old scam seems to never die. Rather it evolves overtime leaving a trail of new victims. Knowledge is power. Inform your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and people you don’t know. Feel free to refer them to this post. i recently Googled Amy Livingston Work From Home Scam and was surprised to find the URL to my blog listed in a forum where they were discussing this very scam. The only way to keep others from being victimized is by letting them know. Thanks for the comment

  10. Pingback: Using Your Home Business Uk

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s